Art Through the Ages – Part 3

Continuing our journey through time to look at the most influential art periods since the Stone Age, we paused after the wonderful era of Neoclassical art to take a breather before we kick start our next venture forward in time to enter the world of Romanticism.

Romanticism – 1780AD – 1850AD

Romanticism – 1780AD – 1850AD

The past eras of art focused more on religion and science, but when Romanticism came along it was all based on a different ethos than anything before it, it was a reflection about the self and a more unorganized way at looking at the world. Romanticism was prevalent during the two great revolutions of America and France, it firmly rejected the Enlightenment concept of the Neoclassical period. Artists of this period came from numerous countries and included Gericault, Delacroix and Turner and they produced moody and dark works.

 

Realism – 1848AD – 1900AD

Realism – 1848AD – 1900AD

Realism took all the emotion and drama and threw it out of the window, it took a more practical view of the times and human nature. It studied the pretend perfection of the scientific approach in Neoclassical art, the hypocritical religious melodrama of Baroque, and the wide embrace of chaos in Romantic and rejected it all. Realism was about the working classes, and the lives of common folk featured prominently, their daily struggles and their humdrum lives. Artists of the time included, Millet and Courbet.

 

Impressionism – 1865AD – 1885AD

The whole point of Impressionism was to forget about religious and political influences and purely to capture something aesthetically. It also rejected rules and regulations regarding to technique in terms of order and form, it gave the artist a much freer hand when creating their art. The end result was not say an actual reproduction of a landscape or a portrait but an impression of what the artist considered as a representation of the subject matter. The star artists of the time were Cassat, Monet and Manet and a great deal of art produced in this period was in watercolor.

Post-Impressionism – 1885AD – 1910AD

A natural progression of Impressionism was Post-Impressionism, which also maintained similar philosophies of rejecting art rules and to search for perfection. The style was the same, giving a free hand to the artists using unrestricted brush techniques. The difference between Impressionism and Post-Impressionism was the artist actually painted forms and not impressions of forms. Notable artists of the time were Toulouse-Lautrec, van Gogh and Rousseau.

Post-Impressionism – 1885AD – 1910AD

Fauvism and Expressionism – 1900AD – 1935AD

Both Expressionism and Fauvism were war babies, and both flourished as art forms during WWI. There is often disturbing content with this art era, painted in dark colors and featuring bold shapes. There were no rules governing the content and some artists such as Matisse painted in very light colors and bright and was considered Fauvist. Whereas Munch and Egon Schiele were much darker in their Expressionism. A great deal of the techniques during this period used oils and acrylics and were bold in their form and content.

Fauvism and Expressionism – 1900AD – 1935AD

The final part of our artistic travel through time evaluates Cubism, Futurism, Dada and Surrealism as well as other movements that take us right up to the present-day art scene.